Tag Archives: youth

Art Party: A look behind the scenes with our OneLove 2013 video shoot

On June 21st, a few members of the ArtQuake team, OneLove art mentors and youth got together at the Purple Thistle to shoot a promo video for this year’s OneLove Arts Festival. The shoot was directed by  Levi Hildebrand with videographer Jamie Edgar, of Lively Willy  Productions.

Brace yourself; because the following is jam packed with too much behind the scenes awesomeness, your dial up server may not be able to handle it:

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The following polaroids were taken by one of the youth photography “mentees” during the session:

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By, Rachel Gamboa
Photography Mentor, OneLove Mentorship Program 2013
@rachelagamboa

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What YOUth said: Insights from the Arts in Action Dialogue

Thank you for all of those who came out to the Arts in Action dialogue. It truly was a fun and inspiring day! Here are some of the highlights from the comments and insights gained through the World Cafe Discussion questions, which tackled the different angles of the relationship between art and discrimination, and how we may use art to create diverse and inclusive communities. Please share your comments and thoughts below!

As a lot of art sells for thousands of dollars at exclusive events and shows, how can public spaces in Vancouver be used to make art more accessible?

It just so happened that for this question we focused on visual art. This question allowed for some venting about how the high cost of art supplies and studio space makes it inaccessible to many students and youth. There was a consensus that we would like to see progressive policies from Government at different levels supporting the arts. The group soon delved deeper into the roots of this issue and asked the question: “what is the motive for creating art?” Is it fame or wealth? The money-centric, class-differenciated reality of our present day society has made art a luxury that can mostly be afforded by a rich elite. This often creates a dilemma for artists who rely on this exclusive culture to sell their work. Finally, there needs to be a balance between artists making a living while not being motivated by money in such a way that they would make their art inaccessible to those without the material means. The group then began to question whom are considered artists and decided that the production of art should not be exclusive to those who are professional artists. As one participant put it: “Art should be more like exercise – everyone should do it.” Finally, it was clear that appropriate public spaces need to be selected for sharing art in a way that will encourage connection and community, and that a general public education is needed in order to appreciate art in public spaces.

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Class, Taste, and British Student TV

The television in the student accommodation, which I shared with five other students in Bradford last year, was not often the source of particularly thought-provoking fare. However, when the two art students in the flat wanted to watch In the Best Possible Taste, we were provided with a rare exception. In each episode of this three-part series, Turner Prize winner Grayson Perry explored taste—“why people buy the things they do and wear the things they wear, and what they are trying to say about themselves when they make those choices”—among representatives of a different British class. He visited his subject’s homes and participated in their social activities in an inquisitive yet empathetic and perceptive manner. He would then create two massive tapestries, which symbolised what he felt he had learned about his model’s taste, aspirations, and difficulties. The subjects of the episode are then invited into his gallery to view the tapestries. Each episode spawned long-lasting discussions in my flat; we even missed a good chunk of the second episode because we started yakking during a commercial break and didn’t stop. I don’t know if my art student flatmates would agree with me—I should probably ask them—but in my opinion, good art creates those kinds of discussions.

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Dirty Hands

I was cleaning off my brushes and palettes, (AKA old plastic Chinese food containers ho ho,) the night after the ArtQuake OneLove show on Friday– and I found myself just… staring.

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OneLove 2012: In retrospect

Time flies by. It was only a few months ago ArtQuake was searching for passionate, creative youth to join our OneLove youth committee. Six months and one fantastic night of live performing and visual arts later, the One Love youth program finally came to a close.

The Committee, made up of six enthusiastic youth, received workshops and training in marketing, budgeting, fundraising and other skills related to project management. ArtQuake brought in facilitators from all over Vancouver to provide the resources necessary for the committee to acquire the necessary skills to feel confident applying their new skill set to organizing what would be the fourth annual OneLove show.

And so the adventure began, equipped with the knowledge and tools to plan ArtQuake’s annual summer show, the team set off to turn their ideas into action. With guidance from the ArtQuake staff, each individual youth took on their own respective roles and responsibilities, utilizing their own personal strengths to contribute to team’s collective goal to mount Onelove successfully.

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